Mustard and Herb Rubbed Rack of Goat

I’ve roasted  racks of goat several times, but I was terrified as I went to make my usual recipe from my favorite goat meat, milk, and cheese cookbook and realized that it contained both breadcrumbs and most tragically, that my staple dijon mustard has sugar in it. Aggh.

I quickly adapted the recipe because I had the rack ready and was 45 minutes from starving. The results worked wonders and all who ate agreed that it was just as good as the original. Hoo-rah! Also, Aurelia ate straight off the bone, which made me so proud of her.

The cooking time on a rack is very dependent on the size of the goat. I’ve had cabrito, which is a young goat, and the rack is small needing only 20 minutes to roast. This was an older goat, called chevron, and it took nearly 45 minutes to cook through to a temperature of 155, which will be about medium. For more medium rare, go to 145 degrees.

Mustard and Herb Rubbed Rack
Adapted from Goat by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough

Ingredients:
1 rack of goat
2 Tbs yellow mustard
1/3 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1/3 cup ground pecans
1 tsp herbes de provence
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Rub the mustard over both sides of the rack. On a plate or shallow dish, combine the coconut, pecans, herbes de provence, salt and pepper. Lay the mustard coated rack on the mixture and turn over to coat the other side. Press the topping gently to make as much stick as possible. Put the rack on a roasting pan or in a cast iron skillet with the fatty side of the meat facing up. Roast until internal temperature reaches 145-155 degrees, 20-50 minutes, depending on the size of the rack. Once the meat is done, let it rest on a cutting board for 10 minutes before slicing the rack between the bones.

I served this simply with boiled peas, which I drained and mixed with tons of butter, lemon juice, salt and pepper. They were delicious and the perfect green accompaniment.

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